Category Archives: Innovative Practitioner

Technology in My Classroom

Working with Ableton (Live and Push) has been an experience the last few weeks.  I went from knowing just about nothing to having to do a cover of a pop song with a group of middle schoolers (as their helper).  What has freaked me out about using this technology is all of the possibilities of what you can use it for and with.  You don’t really even need to have formal music training to use it, and in a way it can kind of supplement for a music course because through the process of using it you have to figure certain things out.  I think that is kind of the point with this project.  I am working with a couple of middle schoolers with not music training, who kind of know what they are doing with Ableton, and I am a student that has some music training and is not completely familiar with the technology.  In a way we can kind of balance each other out.  Another benefit of this project is getting used to working with people from a distance that you can’t see.

I think that I might like to do something like this in my own classroom if I am given the freedom in a music class like this.  There are a lot of possibilities with Ableton, and with having people to work with.  I would probably stray from the sink-or-swim model that this current project is following (at least that is the way that it seems from my perspective) and have more of a structured approach to using this program.  I would try to give my students more music training before handing them over to college students that may not know how to work with children from afar.  While teaching them what to do with the technology I would try to make sure that they know what it is that they are actually doing, like how to tell what the time signature is (and what a time signature is) and how to listen for a different note (as in a bass line) and how to try and find the key for that so that they know more or less what notes they will need to complete the song.

I also think that communication about the project between students would be beneficial so that they can perhaps form their own groups (between the middle schoolers and college students) like have introduction videos and where their strengths are before randomly assigning them.  I would also like to see more collaboration between people to see what songs they will want to do, so that no one gets stuck on something that they don’t like or that is too hard.  One way to make this whole thing easier would be to maybe have larger groups and assign them to different parts because a larger group on the same song might allow them to collaborate more and get help where they need it, particularly from their peers that they are actually in class with.  This would keep everybody interested, and if they get done early maybe they can split into smaller groups and try another song, and take on different responsibilities.  This would enable them to move around and explore more of Ableton without getting frustrated over not understanding something or getting bored.

I am not sure how realistic some of my ideas are, because I don’t have experience teaching yet, and I am not sure all of the work that it would take and has taken to work on this collaborative project; but they are just some things that have come to mind as I am going though this and I would actually like to try out if I am given the chance.

20160427_185724

Flexible Musician

How do you deal with different levels of musicians within an ensemble?

Every ensemble is going to have a gap in the experience and abilities of the members, and as a director it is your job to be able to deal with that.  Green said that “Having clear focus and discipline is essential” (Green, 2003, p. 68), and this is applicable to both the students and the director because they have to work together to make the progress that they need.  Students often are not able to bridge the gaps between them on their own, so it is best to be able to address these issues in a large ensemble setting and give them the tools to be able to work on the gaps.  Ways to do this are to get different types and levels of repertoire, enough to challenge the students with lower abilities but also at a good level for the students with higher abilities.  Having a balance with the repertoire is important because it shows the students that you care about them building their skills, and also shows that you are helping them get the most out of their musical experience. Ayers said that “The root word of “evaluation” is “value,” and authentic assessment includes understanding what students value and building from there” (Ayers & Alexander-Tanner, 2010, p. 81), and I think that this ties in with different levels of musicians because you are helping them build a balance between their music and their skills.

Innovative Practitioner

How do you incorporate theory into ensemble classes and also show students the benefit of it?

In order to successfully incorporate theory into an ensemble setting, the students must be taught the very basics from the beginning.  This can be done in the first few minutes of class every day, for repetition, and should be applied to repertoire as much as possible.  Once the students begin to recognize and understand the basics in the context of the repertoire then you can move onto things that are slightly more complicated.  In a study, “Eleven participants described progressing methodically from simple to complex in classroom instruction” (Paney & Buoniviri, 2013, p. 407) when teaching melodic dictation to their AP Music Theory classes, and this approach can be applied to any teaching of music theory.  This approach would work well with the basics, especially when put into certain contexts, because it worked well when teaching students to listen to and dictate both rhythms and notes, and even at a complex level, when they had little to no experience.  Approaching theory like this, or any music in general, and putting it into a context is when students will begin to comprehend, and see the importance in what they are learning.  Being able to understand the mechanics behind music will make them better musicians, because they will be doing more than just playing the notes on their page, they will be actively engaged and finding exactly how they and their part fit into and function as part of the whole ensemble.

Inquisitive Thinker

How do I know that I am teaching well? That I am comfortable with the way that I teach?

I think that at some point every teacher will begin to question whether they are doing things the right way, and they need to be able to think objectively about what they are doing in order to evaluate themselves.  It is important to look at both the teacher and the students.  One thing that might get in the way is a teacher’s unwillingness to change simply because they themselves are comfortable the way things are, even if the students are not.  Teachers need to be able to think critically about themselves, and this can be done by first observing others teach.  In a study, undergraduate students began teaching and “soon found themselves not only observing other teachers but critically analyzing the teaching methods and outcomes they observed in order to assess what strategies were effective and what teacher actions they may later integrate into their teaching” (Haston & Russell, 2011, p. 386).  This is something that every teacher should do, because by observing others objectively and then turning around and doing the same thing to yourself you can begin to see what direction you want to go from there.  Another way to evaluate your own teaching style is to simply look at the students and see how they react to your teaching style, see how much progress they have achieved since you started teaching them.  This can be done after observing other teachers and their students, and compare the way their students react versus your own.

Community Leader

How do you keep students motivated when music gets more difficult and they might feel discouraged?

Barry Green (2003) said that “Music is one of the most powerful sources of truth that we have: it has the power to change lives” (p. 271) and this is something that teachers and students need to remind themselves of when things get hard.  When students are struggling with something, it is important that both the student and the teacher take the time to address the problem and approach it carefully.  There are people that shut down when they don’t understand something or begin to have problems, and teachers have to be able to deal with them.  Sometimes it is as simple as slowing things down in ensemble rehearsal, not singling anyone out, but working things out as a group in the hopes that the student will catch on or those around them will help.  Sometimes students require more focused or individual attention, like working with a particular section or pulling them to the side and focusing solely on them until they start making progress.  When I have problems, I simply remind myself that “All musicians have bad days” (Green, 2003, p. 275) and that because music is so important I should work hard to keep it a part of me, and this is something to remind students of.

References

Ayers, W., & Alexander-Tanner, R. (2010). To teach: The journey, in comics. New York: Teachers College Press.

Green, B. (2003). The mastery of music: Ten pathways to true artistry. New York: Broadway Books.

Haston, W., & Russell, J. A. (2011). Turning Into Teachers: Influences of Authentic Context

Learning Experiences on Occupational Identity Development of Preservice Music Teachers. Journal of Research in Music Education, 59(4), 369-392. doi:10.1177/0022429411414716

Paney, A. S., & Buonviri, N. O. (2013). Teaching Melodic Dictation in Advanced Placement Music

Theory. Journal of Research in Music Education, 61(4), 396-414. doi:10.1177/0022429413508411

Final Paper and Poster

20160427_185724Final Paper (Intro)

Flexible Musician

How do you deal with different levels of musicians within an ensemble?

Every ensemble is going to have a gap in the experience and abilities of the members, and as a director it is your job to be able to deal with that.  Green said that “Having clear focus and discipline is essential” (Green, 2003, p. 68), and this is applicable to both the students and the director because they have to work together to make the progress that they need.  Students often are not able to bridge the gaps between them on their own, so it is best to be able to address these issues in a large ensemble setting and give them the tools to be able to work on the gaps.  Ways to do this are to get different types and levels of repertoire, enough to challenge the students with lower abilities but also at a good level for the students with higher abilities.  Having a balance with the repertoire is important because it shows the students that you care about them building their skills, and also shows that you are helping them get the most out of their musical experience. Ayers said that “The root word of “evaluation” is “value,” and authentic assessment includes understanding what students value and building from there” (Ayers & Alexander-Tanner, 2010, p. 81), and I think that this ties in with different levels of musicians because you are helping them build a balance between their music and their skills.

Innovative Practitioner

How do you incorporate theory into ensemble classes and also show students the benefit of it?

In order to successfully incorporate theory into an ensemble setting, the students must be taught the very basics from the beginning.  This can be done in the first few minutes of class every day, for repetition, and should be applied to repertoire as much as possible.  Once the students begin to recognize and understand the basics in the context of the repertoire then you can move onto things that are slightly more complicated.  In a study, “Eleven participants described progressing methodically from simple to complex in classroom instruction” (Paney & Buoniviri, 2013, p. 407) when teaching melodic dictation to their AP Music Theory classes, and this approach can be applied to any teaching of music theory.  This approach would work well with the basics, especially when put into certain contexts, because it worked well when teaching students to listen to and dictate both rhythms and notes, and even at a complex level, when they had little to no experience.  Approaching theory like this, or any music in general, and putting it into a context is when students will begin to comprehend, and see the importance in what they are learning.  Being able to understand the mechanics behind music will make them better musicians, because they will be doing more than just playing the notes on their page, they will be actively engaged and finding exactly how they and their part fit into and function as part of the whole ensemble.

Inquisitive Thinker

How do I know that I am teaching well? That I am comfortable with the way that I teach?

I think that at some point every teacher will begin to question whether they are doing things the right way, and they need to be able to think objectively about what they are doing in order to evaluate themselves.  It is important to look at both the teacher and the students.  One thing that might get in the way is a teacher’s unwillingness to change simply because they themselves are comfortable the way things are, even if the students are not.  Teachers need to be able to think critically about themselves, and this can be done by first observing others teach.  In a study, undergraduate students began teaching and “soon found themselves not only observing other teachers but critically analyzing the teaching methods and outcomes they observed in order to assess what strategies were effective and what teacher actions they may later integrate into their teaching” (Haston & Russell, 2011, p. 386).  This is something that every teacher should do, because by observing others objectively and then turning around and doing the same thing to yourself you can begin to see what direction you want to go from there.  Another way to evaluate your own teaching style is to simply look at the students and see how they react to your teaching style, see how much progress they have achieved since you started teaching them.  This can be done after observing other teachers and their students, and compare the way their students react versus your own.

Community Leader

How do you keep students motivated when music gets more difficult and they might feel discouraged?

Barry Green (2003) said that “Music is one of the most powerful sources of truth that we have: it has the power to change lives” (p. 271) and this is something that teachers and students need to remind themselves of when things get hard.  When students are struggling with something, it is important that both the student and the teacher take the time to address the problem and approach it carefully.  There are people that shut down when they don’t understand something or begin to have problems, and teachers have to be able to deal with them.  Sometimes it is as simple as slowing things down in ensemble rehearsal, not singling anyone out, but working things out as a group in the hopes that the student will catch on or those around them will help.  Sometimes students require more focused or individual attention, like working with a particular section or pulling them to the side and focusing solely on them until they start making progress.  When I have problems, I simply remind myself that “All musicians have bad days” (Green, 2003, p. 275) and that because music is so important I should work hard to keep it a part of me, and this is something to remind students of.

References

Ayers, W., & Alexander-Tanner, R. (2010). To teach: The journey, in comics. New York: Teachers College Press.

Green, B. (2003). The mastery of music: Ten pathways to true artistry. New York: Broadway Books.

Haston, W., & Russell, J. A. (2011). Turning Into Teachers: Influences of Authentic Context

Learning Experiences on Occupational Identity Development of Preservice Music Teachers. Journal of Research in Music Education, 59(4), 369-392. doi:10.1177/0022429411414716

Paney, A. S., & Buonviri, N. O. (2013). Teaching Melodic Dictation in Advanced Placement Music

Theory. Journal of Research in Music Education, 61(4), 396-414. doi:10.1177/0022429413508411

Group Music Leading

MUE 110 Group Teaching (Tanyon, Andrea, Janelle) – 4/19/16

Rationale

This activity is an interactive song utilizing patting, clapping, and stomping.  It addresses the concepts of risk-taking, unity and variety, and groove.  The students will be learning about dynamics through the different movements (pat, clamp, stomp) by getting louder each time there is a switch.  They will also be learning about basic rhythms and staying in time with a group, and each time there is a rotation either improvising or copying a previous improvisation.  This is a group activity that also calls students out as leaders, and requires that everyone stay together and actively participate.

Procedure

  • Gather students in a circle around teachers
  • The piano intro plays to get students’ attention (Tanyon)
  • Teachers get in center of circle and begin the song with the patting (Andrea), then clapping (Janelle), then stomping (Tanyon)
  • Start patting quietly and sing the song, (“We pat and we pat in the patting song, this is how we pat so pat along…”) then improvise a short simple rhythm that the group will repeat
  • Teachers cue students to join in
  • After completion of the call and response of the patting move onto the clapping, then repeat for stomping, getting louder each time
  • The piano part plays again while the teachers select three willing students to be in the center to improvise the call for patting, clapping, and stomping
  • After the completion of the rotation three new students will be chosen (during the piano interlude) and the activity repeated
  • Complete as many rotations as it takes to get through everyone or until time runs out

Assessment

The success of this activity will be based on the students’ active participation and (hopefully) enjoyment of the activity as a whole.  They will have successfully completed it if they have remained engaged throughout the whole thing, followed directions, and done their part: singing at obviously different dynamic levels, maintaining a steady beat while singing, improvising rhythms of the proper length (8 beats) while maintaining the groove/tempo, and reproducing other students’ patted/clapped/stomped rhythmic calls accurately.

Reflection

The overall activity was a success because all of the students actively participated to the best of their abilities and seemed to enjoy the activity as a whole (2:24). Most of them remained engaged the entire time and paid attention to all of the actions and little instructions that were given throughout.  They seemed to grasp the basic instructions even when they weren’t specifically being told to do the entire time.  They also seemed to catch onto the concepts that we were trying to address: risk-taking, unity and variety, and groove, even when we didn’t tell them what we were looking for.  The group only required some guidance at times when they weren’t doing exactly what we needed them to, like coming in and joining the patting with the teachers, singing the words, and copying the rhythm that was just given to them (1:09 versus 1:52, 2:08 and 2:39).  Even though the students didn’t need every step explained to them, I would have liked to give some more basic instructions at the beginning so as to not have any confusion when starting the singing and copying rotation (0:18).  To extend this experience I would like to have someone playing the piano riff each time that there was singing, during it, to keep a steady tempo the whole time.  I feel that having the piano going most of the time would help with making sure that everyone is singing (no voice would stick out if that was an issue for some students) and also to help with making sure they are singing the right dynamics.  I would also like to add another component to it, like perhaps having the students choose the next person instead of the teachers or add a dance to make it feel more involved, relaxed, and enjoyable.  From this experience I learned that sometimes minimal explanation is the best way to teach, especially interactive group activities.  While I think that this one could have used a little more verbal instruction, it seemed to go a lot smoother than my previous teachings where I gave what seemed like too much instruction for a simple activity.  Collaborating with others for a teaching was a good experience because we were able to combine all of our strengths to make the activity as successful as possible, and I was able to learn from people with different teaching styles than my own.

 

 

 

 

Professional Development Seminar

Christina Soper’s seminar “Crawl, Walk, Run: Prioritizing Your Beginning Instrumental Curriculum” at AMEA was all about curricular pacing: having to slow down and give them the tools that they need in order to build a good foundation as performers.  Beginning band directors have to make sure that by the time their students graduate from their program and move to higher levels of music classes that their students are able to do what they need to, and that they do it well.  Building good foundations is what helps musicians in the long-run.  Instilling good playing habits and literacy increases their success as musicians, and it all starts at the beginning.  Beginning band directors have the responsibility of recruitment, their success in this affects junior high and high school band programs, and they have the responsibility of giving the students all of the tools for success.  These tools include finding the right instrument (what the student is most suited to play), establishing procedures (both in the classroom and taking proper care of their instruments), teaching rhythms and music, and how to read them and how to articulate.  Most people don’t recognize the important job that beginning band directors have, their programs affect a student’s entire musical experience, and the programs of other schools for which their school is a feeder.  Going to this seminar really improved my views on and respect for beginning band directors, because Ms. Soper highlighted all of their responsibilities and showed their importance.

In-Class Teaching Episode #2

Percussion Improvisation Circle (Day 2) Lesson Plan: 29 March 2016

Rationale:

The Percussion Improvisation Circle is an exercise to teach students some basic rhythms, encourage musical creativity, and get them comfortable performing for a group. The goal of the Circle is to expand students’ musical understanding and experience, getting them to improvise a rhythm while moving (some kind of simple dance).  By getting each student to successfully improvise a rhythm, the main concept I will be addressing is risk-taking, because they are doing something new and as individuals.  This activity also addresses unity and variety, and groove.

Materials:

  • Various non-pitch percussion instruments for each person (wood blocks, tambourine, sticks, etc.)
  • Open space

Procedure:

  1. Introduce the different rhythm sets (quarter notes, eighth notes, groove: boom-clap-boom-clap-clap-clap) first as demonstration then add the students in, having them copy each one

-should take about a minute

  1. Introduce a simple dance, moving side-to-side every two beats, to internalize the beat

-students with larger instruments do not have to do the dance

-take no more than 30 seconds

  1. Assign students a non-pitch percussion instrument, they do not have to have one if they do not wish to (mostly if they want to do the groove rhythm)

-take less than a minute

  1. Assign groups to each rhythm set, based on students’ abilities and instrument types (larger instruments should have quarters, smaller instruments should have eighths, any instrument can take the groove)

-take no more than 30 seconds or so

  1. Set up the groups in a collective circle, with rhythm groups together,

-take no more than 30 seconds

  1. Put it all together as a group, starting with quarters, then adding eighths, then the groove

-take no more than a couple of measures

  1. Once a steady pulse and groove are established, teacher will begin the improvisation rotation, indicating which student will start and cue them: each student will have eight measures or so to complete their improvisation, with a couple bars between each student

-take the rest of the time

Assessment:

Each student will be given the chance to improvise, and will be evaluated based on ability to complete the activity successfully, both their improvisation and their participation in the basic rhythms.  When students perform their improvisation they will be using their new understandings of rhythms, showing their creativity, and be more comfortable performing on an instrument.

Extension:

To extend this experience, students will be given non-pitch instruments again, and a dance will be introduced. The new dance will be based on the groove and allow students to be completely involved in the activity and music.

Reflection:

With this teaching some things that I felt went well were everyone’s ability to follow the directions and complete the activity with little-to-no difficulty.  Everyone was able to successfully complete their improvisations both times that we went around the circle, and there were no awkward stop-and-start moments when transitioning.  Some things that could have gone better were my general instruction, and having better instrumentation.  I began to go out of order with the steps (00:40, 00:55, 2:02) because as I was instructing I felt that the plan that I had wasn’t the best way to proceed.  The activity did not go as long as planned (5:23) because there weren’t as many people as I was expecting, and it was because of the smaller group that the instrumentation wasn’t that diverse.  The instrumentation should have been more diverse because the instruments didn’t all blend well together.  Some instruments were louder than others, and it was because of this that some of the improvisations weren’t very clear or heard over the group (5:08, 5:15).  Going forward I think that I should think my plan over a little more and practice it more so that in the middle of teaching I am not changing what I am supposed to be doing. For next time I would like to pick better instruments and assign them rather than do a free-for-all (2:08).  I also think that next time it would be beneficial to take more time in-between the steps and directions to transition smoother and allow the group to process what is happening as we move forward.  I would like next time to focus more on the movement and pulse to keep everyone together, and really encourage people to be more free in their improvisations, making them longer and more creative with the different instruments.

Research and Resources

Articles:

  1. Andrew S. Paney and Nathan O. Buoniviri, Teaching Melodic Dictation in Advanced Placement Music Theory, Journal of Research in Music Education. Principles: Innovative Practitioner.  Abstract: In this study approaches to teaching melodic dictation skills used by Advanced Placement (AP) Music Theory teachers were examined. Twelve high school teachers from four states were interviewed. Four themes emerged from the interview transcripts: cognitive frameworks, processing strategies, rhythm, and course design. Participants generally confirmed established understandings of aural skills pedagogy, particularly in areas of pattern instruction, connecting aural and written theory, connecting sight-singing and dictation, incorporating scale degree function, targeting melodic “bookends,” focusing on the big picture, sequencing curricula, and incorporating familiar melodies. Unique to the findings of this study were participants’ positive attitudes toward a standardized test and their concern for the students’ psychological barriers inherent in learning aural skills. A general indifference to rhythm counting systems and a common acknowledgment of students’ difficulties with rhythmic notation also were found. Recommendations for further research include a large-scale survey of melodic dictation strategies taught by AP Music Theory teachers, empirical investigation of the efficacy of specific counting systems, comparison of students’ reported dictation strategies and their success with dictation on the AP exam, and exploration of the influence of psychological fortitude on the dictation process.  Rationale: This article can address the Innovative Practitioner principle because it describes a way of teaching, and from it teachers can draw ideas from the study and apply them to their own classroom or adapt new ideas from the methods.
  2. Warren Haston and Joshua A. Russell, Turning into Teachers Influences of Authentic Context Learning Experiences On Occupational Identity Development of Preservice Music Teachers, Journal of Research in Music Education. Principles: Inquisitive Thinker. Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the occupational identity development of undergraduate music education majors as they participated in a yearlong authentic context learning (ACL) experience situated within a professional development school (PDS). Five undergraduate music education majors enrolled in either a string pedagogy class or an instrumental methods class were required to teach in the band or string projects at the PDS. The authors utilized a multiple case study method and collected data from interviews, observations, and participant written reflections. The transformation of data included transcribing interviews and indexing student reflections. The authors identified four emergent themes: the development of general pedagogical knowledge, knowledge of self, performer/teacher symbiotic outcomes, and professional perspectives. The impact of the perceived positive or negative ACL experiences as well as interactions with peers was mediated by either adaptive or maladaptive participant responses to ACL experiences. Participants’ descriptions fit the framework of an extended apprenticeship of what the authors labeled a critical apprenticeship of observation. Based on these findings, they developed a conceptual diagram in order to describe the impact of the ACL experiences on teacher occupational identity development.  Rationale: This article addresses the Inquisitive Thinker principle because it offers a way to analyze different aspects of a teacher, and apply that to one’s own identity as a teacher.
  3. Franscesca Comas Rubi, Xavier Motilla-Salas, and Bernat Suerda-Garcia, Pedagogical innovation and music education in Spain: Introducing the Dalcroze method in Catalonia, Pedagogica Historica. Principles: Innovative Practitioner.  Abstract: The aim of this paper is to analyse how the Dalcroze method was introduced to Spain and became known there, more specifically in the Catalonia of theNoucentismemovement, and why it made the greatest impact and was more widely disseminated in this particular region of Spain. Following a summary of Dalcroze’s contributions to music education, an outline is given of how the Junta para la Ampliación de Estudios or Committee for Extended Studies (the JAE, in Spanish) became a springboard for the method’s introduction in Catalonia through a grant awarded to Catalan musician and teacher Joan Llongueras Badía, even though the JAE had not shown much interest in its diffusion. It goes on to explain how the method’s use spread in Catalonia, partly thanks to the efforts of Joan Llongueras and his Institute for Rhythmic Gymnastics and partly as a result of the support that these efforts received in the political, philosophical, moral and aesthetic context of theNoucentismemovement – which, the paper argues, explains why the method’s impact was much greater in Catalonia than in the rest of Spain.  Rationale: This article addresses the Innovative Practitioner principle because it is about a method from one place being applied to another, something that teachers are always doing.  It shows the method, how it was introduced, and effects from the experiment, and teachers can either try this exactly or they can use the way it was done with other methods.
  4. Heidi Partti and Sidsel Karlsen, Reconceptualising musical learning: new media, identity and community in music education, Music Education Research. Principles: Innovative Practitioner, Flexible Musicianship, Community Leader.  Abstract: Societal and technological progresses have created a multitude of new ways for people to engage with music, and as a result music can nowadays be learned from an ever-expanding variety of sources. In this article, we engage in a theoretical exploration of the underpinning societal forces that have enabled this expansion, as well as its significance for the development of musical identity and knowledge. The exploration proceeds through sociological theories of modernity and theories of sociocultural learning. Examples from a recent ethnographic study of the Finnish online music community Mikseri provide insight into how musical identities can be constructed and maintained in web-based reality, as well as how online music sites may function as communities of practice where the members, through sharing and discussing their own music, develop music-related knowledge. A discussion about the implications of the current media-musical situation for music education practice and research is provided.  Rationale: This article addresses the principles of Flexible Musician, Innovative Practitioner, and Community Leader because it shows how technology can be applied to music communities and how knowledge of and exposure to different musics affect those communities.

Books:

  1. Barry Green, The Mastery of Music: Ten Pathways to True Artistry. Principles: Flexible Musicianship, Community Leader.  Abstract: Barry Green turns his expert hand to the artistic qualities that make an extraordinary musician. Culling advice from dozens of interviews with legends including Joshua Bell, Dave Brubeck, Jeffrey Kahane, Bobby McFerrin, Christopher Parkening, Doc Severinsen, Frederica von Stade, the Harlem Boys Choir, and the Turtle Island String Quartet, he reveals that it’s not enough to have a cerebral and emotional connection to the notes. Green shows how musical excellence, exhibited by true virtuosos, requires a mastery of ten unique qualities of the soul and the human spirit, such as confidence, passion, discipline, creativity, and relaxed concentration, and he discusses specific ways in which all musicians, composers, and conductors can take their skills to higher levels. He carefully incorporates all instruments and techniques in his rejuvenating discussions, inspiring the stifled student to have fun again and the over-rehearsed performer to rediscover the joy of passionate expression.  Rationale: This book addresses the principles of Flexible Musician and Community Leader because it offers ways for musicians to grow, and includes something for all instruments so that all musicians can grow and this is a book that both teachers and students can refer to.
  2. William Ayers and Ryan Alexander-Tanner. To Teach: The Journey in Comics.  Principles: Community Leader, Inquisitive Thinking, Innovative Practitioner.  Abstract: To Teach is a vivid, honest portrayal of the everyday magic of teaching, and what it means to be a “good” teacher—debunking myths perpetuated on film and other starry-eyed hero/teacher fictions. Illuminated by the evocative and wry drawings of Ryan Alexander-Tanner, this graphic version of To Teach will engage while it instructs. It is a much-needed reminder of how curiosity, a sense of adventure, and a healthy dose of reflection can guide us all to learn the most from this world as we educate the next generation. Teacher educators and professional developers will want to use this dynamic graphic novel alongside the traditional text for a unique teaching and learning experience.  Rationale: This book addresses the principles Innovative Practitioner, Inquisitive Thinker and Community Leader because it is all about how to run a classroom.  It shows the different roles of a teacher and new ways to teach.
  3. Hildegard Froelich and Carol Frierson-Campbell, Inquiry in Music Education: Concepts and Methods for the Beginning Researcher. Principles: Innovative Practitioner, Inquisitive Thinker.  Abstract: This textbook covers topic formulation, information literacy, reading and evaluating research studies, and planning and conducting original studies within accepted guidelines, based on research conventions in music, the other arts, education, and the humanities… Skills in research and scholarship introduce students to the language and protocols by which to succeed in today’s competitive market of grant writing, arts advocacy, and public outreach as a contributing member of the community of music educators.  Following the legacy begun by Rainbow and Froehlich in Research in Music Education, published in 1987, the objectives of this book are:  to expand what is meant by music education and research, to help students find their niche in those definitions, and to teach tangible skills that are useful for music educators with diverse instructional goals and career aspirations.  Rationale: This book addresses the principles Innovative Practitioner and Inquisitive Thinker because it shows people the importance of learning new things about the field and teaches new skills.
  4. Margaret S. Barrett, Collaborative Creative Thought and Practice in Music. Principles: Innovative Practitioner, Inquisitive Thinker, Community Leader, Flexible Musician. Abstract: Focusing on the domain of music, the approach taken in this book falls into three sections: investigations of the people, processes, products, and places of collaborative creativity in compositional thought and practice; explorations of the ways in which creative collaboration provides a means of crossing boundaries between disciplines such as music performance and musicology; and studies of the emergence of creative thought and practice in educational contexts including that of the composer and the classroom. The volume concludes with an extended chapter that reflects on the ways in which the studies reported advance understandings of creative thought and practice. The book provides new perspectives to our understandings of the role of collaborative thought and processes in creative work across the domain of music including: composition, musicology, performance, music education and music psychology.  Rationale: This book addresses all of the principles because it is about collaborating, learning new things, and being creative.

Websites:

  1. Band Director.com, http://www.banddirector.com. Principles: Innovative Practitioner, Community Leader. Description: This website offers teaching resources, fundraising sources, and ways for music educators to connect with each other.  Rationale: This website addresses the principles Innovative Practitioner and Community Leader because it gives resources to teaching methods and also connects teachers to the community of music education.
  2. K-12 Resources for Music Educators, https://sites.google.com/site/k12musicresources/. Principles: Innovative Practitioner. Description:  This website is a resource center for both music educators and students of any area and education level.  It has resources ranging from places for sheet music to fingering charts to articles, a large variety.  Rationale: This website addresses the Innovative Practitioner principle because it offers resources to teachers that are looking for something that they need for their classroom.
  3. Band World, http://www.bandworld.org. Principles: Innovative Practitioner, Flexible Musicianship. Description: This website offers different resources for band directors, like access to magazines, information about clinics, teaching resources, and computer software.  Rationale: This website addresses the principles Flexible Musician and Innovative Practitioner because it is a teaching resource for both teachers and students, and offers resources to different types of music and instruction methods.
  4. National Association for Music Education, http://www.nafme.org. Principles: Innovative Practitioner, Community Leader. Description: This website offers teaching resources, fundraising sources, and ways for music educators to connect with each other.  Rationale: This website addresses the principles Innovative Practitioner and Community Leader because it gives resources to teaching methods and also connects teachers to the community of music education.